Five ways of reading Plato

When approaching Plato’s dialogues, we are led to a quandary concerning several contradictory positions held, and yet attributed to Socrates. The most blatant of these is between the positions held in Protagoras and Gorgias regarding the Socrates’ view(s) on pleasure. In the former he equates what is ‘good’ with pleasure; while in the latter he rejects this equation put forward by one of his interlocutors (Callicles). I am not interested in resolving this contradiction. Many respected academics […]

Reflections on procrastination, and its paradox

In a near completion of my PhD, it is now a question whether I’d continue with writing on this blog, or take on a more serious approach to life and get a ‘job’. In the meantime, as there are still a couple of months left, I should at least try to populate the blog with more posts. In this particular one, I’ll start with a reflection on procrastination. What is at the core of putting […]

A working ant’s fable

The following is a translation of fable in Dutch, circulating the internet for the last five years or so. The original author is unknown (to me at least), but it has appeared on various sites. My intention is to make it availble in the English language, and the moral point should be obvious to anyone and everyone without further analysis. Anyone in the managerial position would also find some flaws with the fable, but that […]

‘Why write?’, or Blanchot’s double paradox of writing, through Hegel’s paradox of action

Hegel’s paradox of action The paradox of action for Hegel is that I can only discover who I am by acting, but acting already presupposes that I know who I am: ‘an individual cannot know what he really is until he has made himself a reality through action’. [The Spiritual Animal Kingdom, in Hegel’s Phenomenology of the Spirit]. This means that he already has to determine the end of his action [that is, the end in […]